The Charming East Coast Beckons: Learning The Secrets of the Wines of Atlantic Canada

A review of “The Wine Lover’s Guide to Atlantic Canada” by Moira Peters and Craig Pinhey ($37.95):
 
As the Canadian wine industry grows, it has become increasingly pivoted on the wines of British Columbia’s rugged and dramatically changing climes and Ontario’s collection of viticultural pockets, where Burgundian, Alsatian, and German styles of viticuture express themselves in New World Soils.
A recently published work by Moira Peters, a wine educator and professional sommelier, and Craig Pinhey, a sommelier and writer from living in New Brunswick fills in a widening information gap about Canada’s neglected East Coast wine regions.
‘The Wine Lover’s Guide to Atlantic Canada’ does not entirely resemble other dense, esoteric wine texts.  It attempts to capture the aesthetics of the regions through a photgraphic and factual presentation of a region quickly being recognized as a producer of fine wine (especially sparkling wine).
Benjamin Bridge’s Nova 7: a moderately sweet, lightly fizzy sparkling from the Annapolis Valley, Nova Scotia.
Because each province’s strategy for controlling the promulgation of alcohol does not necessarily facilitate cooperation with one another, many Canadians west of the St. Lawrence might be shocked to encounter a thriving wine industry spanning Eastern Canada.
Not yet a commercial dynamo, information on the producers is scarce.  Unless you are lucky enough to live in a province with a control board savvy enough to have negotiated wine from a larger producer (like Jost or Benjamin Bridge) or the winery is staring you in the face as you drive through Gaspereau Valley, the opportunity to try these wines are rare.
It is getting better, however.  Most of the East coast remains a destination wine experience for vacationers and lucky locals.  Though as the reputation of the wine gets better, so does the demand for their wine and interest in what each region specializes in.
Information about what sort of wines are available in each region used to be limited to a collection of vague online articles and academic texts aimed at botanists and ampelographers studying the soil (too academic for the average enthusiast).
‘The Wine Lover’s guide to Atlantic Canada’ fills this demand for information at just the right time in the region’s development.
The volume reminds me of the digest written by Rod Philips to comprehensively lay out Ontario’s wine regions in context with one another.
Both volumes provide a complete picture: there is useful information about style, grape varietals, fruit wines, and climate. There are also charming anecdotes from the proprietors and winemakers about where they live and what they do.
All Canadian wine regions have had their difficulties reaching people’s dinner tables. The book describes a wine region with an outlook that emphasizes the struggles of a wine region to overcome the prejudice and invective new regions encounter.
This phenomenon is something observable and familiar to those who have watched Ontario and B.C. grow and mature over the last three decades.
It would have been observable in the mid twentieth century, as people scoffed at the idea of Australia producing anything resembling a fine consumer luxury.  The same goes for South African Cape and Argentina.
Atlantic Canada’s wine regions are not quite like other wine regions.  They are committed to what grows well in their soil.  There is even a commercially dedicated breeding program in Kentville, Nova Scotia to discover and explore what possible varieties can grow in the soils of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and elsewhere.
New Brunswick, Newfoundland, and Labrador are all mentioned for their thriving fruit wine industries, which cover a range of styles from sweet to dry or table wine to distilled spirits.
The overwhelming majority of the book, which is just over two hundred pages, focuses on Nova Scotia.  The other regions combined take up roughly the same amount of space to discuss.
This can be forgiven, though, since Nova Scotia is definitely the innovative engine responsible for the recent surge in popular interest for East Coast wines.
Moira Pinhey and Craig Peters knew exactly the digestible details to include so as to capture the attention of fellow wine enthusiasts.  This book would also be a suitable conversation piece for someone who appreciates the beauty of the East Coast.  The charming landscapes and abstruse nature of the wineries make ‘The Wine Lover’s Guide to Atlantic Canada’ a compelling and fast read.
Greg is a self-styled “wine raconteur” interested in the education amd appreciation of wine and other consumer luxuries. He has studied with the Wine Council of Ontario, the Wine and Spirit Education Trust, The Wine Scholar Guild, and is currently engaged in a graduate degree focusing on the risk and regulation of controlled substances.

Good Ole Gamay Noir

Hey!

What are you sipping on? I’m having some Gamay Noir from the Niagra Peninsula and it is gooooooood. This wine is light, fruity and pairs beautifully with a warm summer night!

When you think of Gamay, you probably think of Beaujolais first and that makes perfect sense.  I mean these guys have been doing it very well for centuries now. However, this grape varietal is gaining popularity in other cool climate areas, such as Canada.

If you are a fan of pinot noir, then there is a good chance you will like gamay noir, as they share a lot of the same characteristics. The gamay I’m having this evening features cherry, raspberry, strawberry, floral and earthy aromas and flavours. Love it!

One thing to note about gamay noir (or Beaujolais) is the price point. This stuff can be cheap and deliver great quality! You can easily get a bottle for $10-$15 Canadian and be very happy. However, I you want to spend a little more you can get stuff that will knock your socks off! For example, The Grange of Prince Edward makes some of the best Gamay Noir that Ontario has to offer. For an investment of $22.95 CAD you can have one of the best experiences with this grape varietal.

So next time your friend says they like to drink Beaujolais, pour them a glass of Canadian Gamay Noir, and watch their eyes light up!

Cheers,

Nick
Wine Cru Reviews
http://www.winecrureviews.ca

 

Skip the Sauvignon Blanc and Grab Some Semillon

Hey!

Often we gravitate towards something we are familiar with, and wine is no exception.

For white wines, I often witness people reaching for the typical Sauvignon Blanc or Pinot Grigio. DON’T DO IT! I mean don’t get me wrong, those are two great varietals, but wine is an experience….why not try something new once in awhile?

If you are a lover of Sauvignon Blanc, I recommend you try Semillon. It shares a lot of the same characteristics as Sauvignon Blanc, but carries a bit more weight in my opinion. There is a good chance that if they were poured side by side at a blind tasting, you might have a hard time telling the difference between the two.

So if you are looking to try something new, without straying too far from “the usual”, ask for a Semillon!

Have you had a knock-it-out-of-the-park Semillon before? If so, please let us know which ones so we can compare!

Cheers,

Nick
Wine Cru Reviews
http://www.winecrureviews.ca

 

 

 

Try Canadian Cabernet Franc Now!

Hey there!

What’s in your glass today? For me, it’s some Niagra Peninsula Cabernet Franc from Magnotta Winery. This full bodied 2013 VQA (Vintners Quality Alliance) wine features inviting aromas of red berry fruit, spice, earth, herbs and oak. On the palate this wine delivers much of the same, with a nice long finish!

Magnotta winery is one of the many Ontario VQA producers who are establishing Cabernet Franc as a “go to” varietal for Canadian wine consumers. These grapes are often blended with cabernet sauvignon, merlot and baco noir…it also makes for amazing Canadian icewine! Canadian winemakers are serious about their Cab Franc, and the quality found is a reflection of that.

For those who love big reds like Cabernet Sauvignon or Carmenere, Cab Franc is worth the try. It shares a lot of the same characteristics, but the earthiness and herbal notes give it a bit of a twist. Now this “twist” isn’t for everyone! I often find this varietal to be a big hit or miss with people who try it for the first time. Eyes either light up with joy or a cringe of the face sometimes occurs.

For those who don’t appreciate the wine at first, often all that is required is a little oxygen! It is recommended that you decant your wine with a decanter or simply remove the cork and let the wine sit on the table for 30-40 minutes before enjoying the first glass.

Whether you are sure about Cab Franc or not, it is worth exploring!

Cheers,

Nick
Wine Cru Reviews
http://www.winecrureviews.ca

 

 

 

 

What are you drinking?

Hi there,

I’m slowly sipping on a white cotes du rhone and trying to figure out what I would like to say for this first of many blog entries from myself and the team here at Wine Cru Reviews. For someone who usually has a lot to say, this writing thing is kind of hard. More wine needed maybe?

Mainly, I would like to welcome you, our reader… probably my mom. Actually pretty doubtful – simply opening e-mail can be a struggle for her. She’s great at using her iPhone though. I digress…

Our team of wine lovers are hoping to simply bring you quality wine content in a fun and unintimidating way. What does that mean to us? Well to me that means, interesting stories and facts about wine makers/producers, funny stories, winery experiences and adventures, detailed reviews about Canadian and international wines, and a whole lot more in an “easy to drink” kind of way. We will see how this blog evolves over time!

Our commitment to you is to provide straightforward opinions about the wines we try and to provide an educational component to them.

Time for a top up.

So what is it that you are drinking?

Do you try and drink local or are you all about trying stuff not found in your own backyard? I think it’s important to try to support local as much as possible, but it is equally important to explore what the wine world has to offer. It is amazing to me how a varietal can taste drastically different from region to region, country to country. Shiraz from Australia, Malbec from Argentina, Cabernet Franc from Canada? Let us know!

Are you a seasonal wine drinker? Pinot grigio and rose wine in the summer? Big full bodied cabs during the cooler months? In Canada,  particularly in Eastern Ontario, we spend more than half the year surviving our cool climate weather. I tend to enjoy both red and white wines year round, but do find myself gravitating towards certain regions or countries from time to time. Right now, while we patiently wait for summer to arrive I find myself trying many different white wines and lighter reds. However, it did snow a little today… and it is May… might have to switch back to something heavier to warm me up!

One more glass…

It is safe to say that it is our hope that you follow along and participate by commenting and e-mailing us (info@winecrureviews.ca) about anything wine related. Let us know what you are drinking!

Cheers,

Nick
Wine Cru Reviews
http://www.winecrureviews.ca